posted on June 10, 2014 with 67 notes
luz-sonriente:

Arthur Hacker (1858 – 1919)

luz-sonriente:

Arthur Hacker (1858 – 1919)

Tumblr source: beautifulcentury
posted on May 7, 2014 with 510 notes
transparentoctopus:


Stephane Passet, quartier pera, Istanbul 1912

transparentoctopus:

Stephane Passet, quartier pera, Istanbul 1912

Tumblr source: beautifulcentury
posted on April 10, 2014 with 24 notes
wiscohisto:

Two girls, Kenosha county, Wisconsin, 1897.
This is the first picture ever taken by C. E. Dewey, hence the title “Dewey kids - number one.”  It was taken on a 4 x 5 glass photographic plate with a large magazine camera holding 12 plates. It was taken at the rear of the home of C. A. Dewey, 417 Market Street. The young girl with the straw hat is Perdita Irene Dewey and the little girl with the small doll is Vivian Persis Dewey.
via: The State of Wisconsin Collection from the Kenosha County Historical Society by way of the University of Wisconsin Digital Collections.

wiscohisto:

Two girls, Kenosha county, Wisconsin, 1897.

This is the first picture ever taken by C. E. Dewey, hence the title “Dewey kids - number one.”  It was taken on a 4 x 5 glass photographic plate with a large magazine camera holding 12 plates. It was taken at the rear of the home of C. A. Dewey, 417 Market Street. The young girl with the straw hat is Perdita Irene Dewey and the little girl with the small doll is Vivian Persis Dewey.

viaThe State of Wisconsin Collection from the Kenosha County Historical Society by way of the University of Wisconsin Digital Collections.

Tumblr source: wiscohisto
posted on April 6, 2014 with 64 notes
thecivilwarparlor:

Gen. Robert E. Lee, C.S.A.
“We made a great mistake, Mr. Hill, in the beginning of our struggle, and I fear, in spite of all we can do, it will prove to be a fatal mistake. …in the beginning we appointed all our worst generals to command the armies, and all our best generals to edit the newspapers. As you know, I have planned some campaigns and quite a number of battles. I have given the work all the care and thought I could, and sometimes, when my plans were completed, as far as I could see, they seemed to be perfect. But when I have fought them through, I have discovered defects and occasionally wondered I did not see some of the defects in advance. When it was all over, I found by reading a newspaper that these best editor generals saw all the defects plainly from the start. Unfortunately, they did not communicate their knowledge to me until it was too late. … I have done the best I could in the field, and have not succeeded as I could wish. I am willing to yield my place to these best generals, and I will do my best for the cause in editing a newspaper.” Robert E. Lee
http://www.americancivilwarstory.com/robert-e-lee-quotes.html
Digital ID: (digital file from original neg.) cwpb 06237 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cwpb.06237
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-cwpb-06237 (digital file from original neg.)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

Gen. Robert E. Lee, C.S.A.

We made a great mistake, Mr. Hill, in the beginning of our struggle, and I fear, in spite of all we can do, it will prove to be a fatal mistake. …in the beginning we appointed all our worst generals to command the armies, and all our best generals to edit the newspapers. As you know, I have planned some campaigns and quite a number of battles. I have given the work all the care and thought I could, and sometimes, when my plans were completed, as far as I could see, they seemed to be perfect. But when I have fought them through, I have discovered defects and occasionally wondered I did not see some of the defects in advance. When it was all over, I found by reading a newspaper that these best editor generals saw all the defects plainly from the start. Unfortunately, they did not communicate their knowledge to me until it was too late. … I have done the best I could in the field, and have not succeeded as I could wish. I am willing to yield my place to these best generals, and I will do my best for the cause in editing a newspaper.” Robert E. Lee

http://www.americancivilwarstory.com/robert-e-lee-quotes.html

Tumblr source: thecivilwarparlor
"

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

"
— This was found via huffingtonpostwomen
posted on February 18, 2014 with 6 notes
1952: Co-Ed at 76 »

crumblingpages:

image

“Mrs. Virginia Fountain, 76-year-old grandmother, has entered Wayne University, Detroit, aiming at a college degree ‘if it doesn’t take too long.’ Mrs. Fountain entered the second grade at 53, after her husband died and her two children were ‘able to take care of themselves.’ The elderly co-ed…

— This was found via crumblingpages
posted on February 3, 2014 with 3 notes
Tumblr source: forgottenbookmarks

devilduck:

Mysterious Coin-Covered Wishing Trees

The strange phenomenon of gnarled old trees with coins embedded all over their bark has been spotted from the Peak District to the Scottish Highlands in the United Kingdom. One of the larger collections can be seen in the picturesque village of Portmeirion in Wales where there are seven felled tree trunks with coins pushed into them.

The coins are usually knocked into the tree trunks using stones by passers-by, who hope it will bring them good fortune. These fascinating spectacles often have coins from centuries ago buried deep in their bark, warped from the passage of time.

The tradition of making offerings to deities at wishing trees dates back hundreds of years and is similar to the concept of a “wishing well”, where one tosses a coin in for good luck. The “wishing trees” date back to the early 1700s in Scotland where ill people stuck florins into trees with the idea that the trees would take any any illness. However if someone were to take away any of the coins, legend states that they will become ill instead.

sources 1, 2, 3

Tumblr source: devilduck

George & Vulture, City of London

George & Vulture, City of London

(Source: portu666)

Tumblr source: beautifulcentury
bookmania:

Flowers in the Window, Shakespeare & Co. (photo by A.C.)

bookmania:

Flowers in the Window, Shakespeare & Co. (photo by A.C.)

Tumblr source: bookmania